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Compliment to Audrey & the Seven Hills team

Thank you to patient, Kathy L. for posting the following compliment:
“Just finished therapy with Audrey at your Seven Hills location. Thank you Audrey and all the great staff for their dedication, concern and hard work!”

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High Heel Hazards

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10 Ways to Start Exercise: Part 1 of 2

Walking, strength training, running, swimming, biking, yoga, tai chi — the possibilities for exercise are endless. The good news is that it doesn’t matter which one you choose — it just matters that you do some form of exercise.

“If you have a choice between not moving and moving — move,” says Heather Nettle, MA, coordinator of exercise physiology services for the Cleveland Clinic Sports Health and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Center. “Ultimately it will help with overall health and well-being.” So go ahead, find an activity you love and get moving with these 10 do’s and don’ts for starting an exercise routine.

1. Do Anything — It’s Better Than Nothing
Experts are quite clear on this point: Get 30 to 60 minutes of exercise three to five days a week for improved energy, as well as to help prevent heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. If you can’t dedicate that amount of time, any exercise, any movement for any amount of time is better than nothing.

2. Keep Track
Tracking your steps with a pedometer is one key to success if you like to walk, says Michael F. Roizen, MD, chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic. Another is recording some basic health information before starting a new routine. “Keeping track of how your body changes inside and out over the weeks and months gives you proof of the healthy changes you’re making,” he says. A few ways to do it:
• Before your first workout, check your blood pressure at your local pharmacy. Then recheck once a month.
• Time yourself at a track or on a treadmill. See how many minutes it takes you to walk or run one mile. Retest yourself after one month of consistent exercise.
• Measure your waist circumference and your weight. Take these measurements once a week.
• Schedule a visit with your physician and request these tests: lipid panel, vitamin D and C-reactive protein. Check these levels again after six months of consistent exercise.

3. Weight-Train
There’s no question: You’ll shed pounds faster if you lift weights. That’s because strength training builds muscle, and the more muscle you have, the faster your metabolism will be. And women, hear this: You will not bulk up! What you’re doing by lifting weights is preventing muscle loss. Strength training also improves overall body composition, giving you more lean muscle tissue in relation to fat, so you look toned and trim. To experience the most benefit, lift more weight than you think you can. Dashing through your repetitions doesn’t take as much effort because it allows your muscles to rely on momentum. Instead, focus on your form by practicing slow and steady movements on both the contraction and the release. This will help you strengthen every muscle fiber.

4. Head for the Hills
Do you follow the same flat path day in and day out when you go for your walk or run? Look for hills along your route that you can slip into your routine. If it’s too much for you to tackle all at once, start by going only halfway up. Walking or running up inclines boosts the intensity of your workout: It burns more calories and helps build muscle strength and cardiovascular endurance. Switching between flat surfaces and hills is a form of interval training, a type of workout that involves short bursts of high-intensity exercise in between moderate activity. This kind of exercise, practiced by elite athletes, can supercharge your workout. It can also help keep boredom at bay. If you have joint problems, go easy on the downhill — slow your pace and shorten your stride.

5. Think Outside the Box
Even if you can’t engage in rigorous, high-intensity sweat sessions, there are plenty of other ways to improve your physical health. According to a review in the American Journal of Health Promotion, mind-body practices like tai chi and qigong may help promote bone health, cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, balance, quality of life, fall prevention and emotional well-being. Described as “meditation in motion,” tai chi and qigong involve a series of flowing, gentle movements — similar to but much slower than yoga. Interested? Get the Gaiam tai chi for beginners DVD in our clevelandclinicwellness.com wellness store.

Check back in tomorrow for the remaining 5 ways to get started on exercise!

 

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Gentlemen…

protect your prostate by eating olive oil and nuts. Choosing healthy fats over the saturated kind can help you live longer.

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Men, improve your chances of a long and healthy life by choosing olive oil and avocado over butter and mayo. Research shows that men who swapped 10 percent of their daily calories from animal fats with healthy fats like olive oil, seeds, avocados or nuts were 30 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer and 25 percent less likely to die from any other disease compared to those who did not make the switch. Even a single daily tablespoon of oil-based salad dressing, such as balsamic vinaigrette, resulted in a noticeable drop in mortality risk. To protect your health and enjoy delicious flavor, use oil and vinegar instead of cream-based dressings and cook your food with extra virgin olive oil instead of mystery “vegetable” oil.

 
 

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Mean People….Just Stay Positive

CC_Wellness TipTo deal with mean people, “Stay positive and courteous,” says mind-body coach Jane Ehrman. “Fighting back only fuels the problem.”

From rude coworkers to short-tempered bosses to impatient drivers, mean people do make an appearance now and then. As we all know from experience, being the recipient of someone else’s antagonistic behavior can really bring us down, even on an otherwise great day. Research shows that a negative interaction has a five times greater impact on us than a positive one. In other words, it takes five good things to offset just one bad thing. So how do you keep a mean person from ruining your day? Instead of attacking back, kill that meanie with kindness. And treat yourself with kindness too. Sometimes we don’t want to admit that someone has gotten under our skin. Instead of denying your hurt feelings, acknowledge them.

As for the other person, try to see past their actions. “Mean-spirited people are unhappy, to say the least. Inside they are hurting, living out of fear, insecurity and anger. They don’t feel good about themselves or their lives, so they lash out at others,” says Jane Pernotto Ehrman, MEd, mind-body coach and behavioral health specialist at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine. “Mostly, it isn’t about you, it’s about them. Recognizing that there are underlying issues can make it easier for you to respond with compassion and understanding. Take the high road and respond with kindness.” After all, while you can’t change another person’s behavior, you can change your reaction to him or her. Being kind to someone who has hurt you may inspire that person to see the good in themselves as well.

 

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Deep Tissue Massage too Expensive? Try a foam roller instead…

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Can’t afford a deep-tissue massage? Use a foam roller after your workouts to increase circulation and ease knots in all your muscles.

Ever wondered about those foam logs you see people rolling around on at the gym? They’re called foam rollers, and they’re an effective — and inexpensive — addition to your workout. Used as part of a warm-up, rolling improves circulation and gets the body ready for movement. It also helps with recovery after your workout. Like a deep-tissue massage, foam rollers help break up knots that tighten your muscles, helping you stay injury-free. Use them to loosen up tight areas in your quads, calves or outer thighs.

“The basic technique for using a foam roller is to slowly roll the targeted area over the foam roller. Once you hit a trigger spot, hold at that spot for a few seconds, slowly working yourself away from the spot,” says Melissa Hendricks, MEd, manager of the Cleveland Clinic Fitness Centers. “Use a foam roller with caution,” advises Hendricks. “When you hit the trigger spots, they can be very painful, and sometimes the foam rollers can cause mild bruising. Have a physical therapist show you how to properly use the roller when you’re trying it for the first time.”

 

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What is Knee Replacement?
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Knee replacement, also known as a Total Knee Replacement or Knee Arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove worn, diseased or damaged bone and cartilage and replace it with an artificial joint, or prosthesis, that is made of metal and plastic. Undergoing knee replacement surgery can help relieve pain and allows patients to return to normal everyday activities. For those who have become bow-legged or knock-kneed over the years, it can also straighten the legs into a more natural position.

Why a Knee Replacement?
The most common reason for knee replacement surgery is to repair joint damage caused by osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. People who need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. They may also experience moderate or severe knee pain at rest. There are many types of arthritis but most knee pain is caused by just three types: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

• Osteoarthritis. This is an age-related “wear and tear” type of arthritis. It usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older, but may occur in younger people, too. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the knee softens and wears away. The bones then rub against one another, causing knee pain and stiffness.
• Rheumatoid arthritis. This is a disease in which the synovial membrane that surrounds the joint becomes inflamed and thickened. This chronic inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of a group of disorders termed “inflammatory arthritis.”
• Post-traumatic arthritis. This can follow a serious knee injury. Fractures of the bones surrounding the knee or tears of the knee ligaments may damage the articular cartilage over time, causing knee pain and limiting knee function.

Matt Smith Physical Therapy can help with your pre and post-operative care for knee replacement.

 
 

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Everyone Needs a Pedometer

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Need a new way to motivate yourself to be active? Put on a pedometer to move more, weigh less and monitor how much you move each day.

Researchers have found that the simple act of wearing one encourages people to walk more and be more active when they would otherwise be stationary for hours at a time (like at work or in front of the TV). Even if you exercise for 30 minutes a day, you may also spend a lot of time sitting. Taking breaks to stand up, stretch and move around at least once an hour can go a long way toward keeping you healthy and fit. According to Dr. Mike Roizen, chief wellness officer of the Cleveland Clinic, a pedometer is a must-have for everyone. In fact, he recommends owning two. “Buy a backup pedometer, and overpay for it. It is one of the four things in life for which you should overpay: chef’s knife, great walking/exercise shoes, an engagement ring and two pedometers,” he says. That way, you’ll never have an excuse for not using one. Your ultimate walking goal is 10,000 steps per day. No excuses, says Dr. Mike.

 

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USA Today: Patients with back pain often get Wrong Treatment

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Patients with back pain often get the wrong treatment
Nanci Hellmich, USA TODAY 5:18 p.m. EDT July 29, 2013
“The majority of cases of patients with new back pain tend to get better with conservative treatment in three months.”

Story Highlights
• Back pain is one of the most common reasons for going to the doctor
• With treatment of back pain, often “less is more”
• Conservative treatments work for the majority of patients with back pain

Many patients are getting overly aggressive treatments for their back pain, says a large study out today. Physicians today are increasingly giving patients with back pain narcotic drugs, ordering expensive imaging tests or referring them to other physicians rather than offering them the recommended first line of treatment. That more conservative treatment calls for the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), aspirin and naproxen (Aleve), or acetaminophen (Tylenol) and physical therapy, according to national guidelines from the American College of Physicians.

The guidelines caution against early imaging or other aggressive treatments, except in rare cases, says the study’s lead author John Mafi, a chief medical resident at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston. These guidelines are similar to those from other groups, and the bottom-line message is “less is more,” Mafi says. “The majority of cases of patients with new back pain tend to get better with conservative treatment in three months. If they don’t get better, physical therapy is an option. Narcotic medications, such as Percocet or Vicodin, have no proven efficacy in improving chronic back pain.”

Back pain is one of the most common reasons for going to the doctor; more than 10% of visits to primary-care physicians are for this problem and amounts to about $86 billion in health care spending annually, says senior author Bruce Landon, a professor of health care policy and medicine at Harvard Medical School. That’s a conservative estimate because it doesn’t account for lost productivity, he says. Using data from two national surveys, the researchers studied almost 24,000 visits to the doctor for back pain, both acute and chronic, from 1999 to 2010.

Findings published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, a Journal of the American Medical Association Network publication:
– The recommendation for using NSAIDs or acetaminophen per visit decreased from almost 37% in 1999 to about 24.5% in 2010.
– Narcotic drug use increased from about 19% in 1999 to about 29% in 2010.
– Physician referrals increased from about 7% in 1999 to 14% in 2010.
– Scans, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRIs), rose from about 7% to about 11% during that same period.
– Physical therapy remained unchanged at about 20%; X-rays remained unchanged at about 17%.

“With health care costs soaring, improvements in the management of back pain represent an area of potential cost savings for the health care system while also improving the quality of care,” the study says. So why are doctors using these types of treatments? “Patients expect doctors to have some kind of magic cure, and so doctors want to offer them something,” Landon says. “Often it’s easier to offer them something rather than explaining why more aggressive treatments and testing won’t make them better in the long run.”
Donald Casey Jr., a clinical professor of medicine in the department of population health at New York University School of Medicine, who wrote the accompanying editorial, says there are a lot of different reasons for the findings, including the fact that there are 183 different guidelines just for treating low back pain. “A well-constructed clinical practice guideline doesn’t always give you the exact treatment for every single patient every time. But it should give physicians guidance about which treatments are most likely to work best for most patients.”

 

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Did You Know…

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MSPT has physical therapists who specialize in care of the feet. Call today for an immediate appointment.

 
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Posted by on June 20, 2013 in Did You Know...

 

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