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Tag Archives: home fitness programs

Stay Away from the Market when you’re Hungry…

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If you need to stop by the market on your way home from work, eat a healthful snack first to avoid splurging on high-calorie items.
Dropping by the grocery store on your way home from work? Here’s why that could make it harder for you to maintain a healthy diet: Research shows that even short-term food deprivation (like the hours between lunch and quitting time) is enough to make you buy nutritionally bankrupt food. A better time to shop: after you’ve already eaten. If you know you’re stopping by the market on your way home, be sure to have a healthful snack first. Keep a small fruit bowl on your desk, or stock some nuts, sunflower seeds and dried fruit in your drawer. Other good choices to keep in the office fridge: baby carrots, hummus, no-fat string cheese and no sugar added Greek yogurt.

 

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Don’t Lose Sleep!

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Don’t let work eat into your sleep. Lack of rest is the biggest predictor of on-the-job burnout.
Are you letting your job impact your sleep? According to a study published in the journal SLEEP, the more hours a person works, the less sleep he or she gets. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 30 percent of employed Americans get less than the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep a day. Though you may not feel especially tired, lack of sleep could be affecting your performance at work. One study found that sleeping less than six hours a night was one of the best predictors of job burnout. Another study calculated that our collective lack of sleep costs U.S. businesses and medical centers $63.2 billion a year in lost productivity. In other words, you’re actually doing yourself — and your career — a disservice by letting work take away from your sleep time.

 

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Don’t Forget to Neglect Strength Training!

cleveland clinicWalking every day? Good for you! But don’t neglect strength training, which helps preserve muscle and improve balance.
When it comes to preventing health problems, exercise is one of the best medicines we have. It eases anxiety, lowers stress, stabilizes mood, and improves body image and self-esteem. It also helps with hot flashes, back pain and depression. Still, only 20 percent of U.S. adults get even less than the optimal recommended aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Though we’re making progress with aerobic exercise — nearly 52 percent of Americans meet the weekly, but in our opinion still minimal, guidelines of 150 minutes of exercise — only 29 percent of us make strength training a priority. Wondering why you have to do strength training if you’re already walking 150 minutes each week? Strength training helps preserve and build muscle; you otherwise lose one-half of one percent each birthday. Having more muscle also helps you burn calories, which keeps weight under control. It also improves balance to keep you injury-free, and it maintains bones, which can reduce the risk of osteoporosis, says Melissa Hendricks, MEd, manager of the Cleveland Clinic fitness centers. “I think the biggest obstacle I see for Cleveland Clinic employees is that they simply don’t know what they should be doing,” says Hendricks. “And weight rooms can be very intimidating places!” The good news is that you don’t even have to set foot in one to get a good workout. To get started, try these moves, which are perfect for beginners and require nothing more than your body and a set of dumbbells.

Original Post from Cleveland Clinic

 

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What is a Physical Therapist?

Physical therapists (PTs) are health care professionals who treat individuals of all ages, from newborns to the very oldest, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives.

PTs examine each individual and develop a plan using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

Physical therapists provide care for people in a variety of settings, including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, home health agencies, schools, sports and fitness facilities, work settings, and nursing homes. State licensure is required in each state in which a physical therapist practices.

The Physical Therapy Profession

Physical therapy is a dynamic profession with an established theoretical and scientific base and widespread clinical applications in the restoration, maintenance, and promotion of optimal physical function. For more than 750,000 people every day in the United States, physical therapists:

•Diagnose and manage movement dysfunction and enhance physical and functional abilities.
•Restore, maintain, and promote not only optimal physical function but optimal wellness and fitness and optimal quality of life as it relates to movement and health.
•Prevent the onset, symptoms, and progression of impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities that may result from diseases, disorders, conditions, or injuries.

The terms “physical therapy” and “physiotherapy,” and the terms “physical therapist” and “physiotherapist,” are synonymous.

As essential participants in the health care delivery system, physical therapists assume leadership roles in rehabilitation; in prevention, health maintenance, and programs that promote health, wellness, and fitness; and in professional and community organizations. Physical therapists also play important roles both in developing standards for physical therapist practice and in developing health care policy to ensure availability, accessibility, and optimal delivery of health care services. Physical therapy is covered by federal, state, and private insurance plans. Physical therapists’ services have a positive impact on health-related quality of life.

As clinicians, physical therapists engage in an examination process that includes:

•taking the patient/client history,
•conducting a systems review, and
•performing tests and measures to identify potential and existing problems.

To establish diagnoses, prognoses, and plans of care, physical therapists perform evaluations, synthesizing the examination data and determining whether the problems to be addressed are within the scope of physical therapist practice. Based on their judgments about diagnoses and prognoses and based on patient/client goals, physical therapists:

•provide interventions (the interactions and procedures used in managing and instructing patients/clients),
•conduct re-examinations,
•modify interventions as necessary to achieve anticipated goals and expected outcomes, and
•develop and implement discharge plans.

Physical therapy can be provided only by qualified physical therapists (PTs) or by physical therapist assistants (PTAs) working under the supervision of a physical therapist.

Source: Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, 2nd Edition (2003)

 

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Gyms May be too Expensive for Some…Ask your Matt Smith Physical Therapist for Suggestions

thAre you having trouble affording a gym membership? In today’s economy, many of us want to be fit and healthy but too often money becomes an issue. If you can’t afford the gym, get fit at home with the use of an exercise DVD or video from the local library. Library cards are free and so is the rental.

Home fitness programs can be effective for young and older adults and for any fitness level. A gym is a great place to get in shape, but when the expensive deters your efforts, it’s time to consider an at-home DVD. Research shows DVD or Video fitness programs help older and younger adults alike. Research has also shown that activity and physical fitness staves off muscle decline and disability. So get to the library!

If you’re nervous about picking a workout that’s right for you, talk to a Matt Smith physical therapist, who may be able to recommend a workout type perfect for your fitness level.

 

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