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Tag Archives: daily health tip

Do you feel Born to Run, but Walk instead to save your Knees?

As long as your joints are healthy to begin with, it may be safe to pick up the pace.

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If you’ve been reluctant to make running one of your New Year’s resolutions, fear no more. A common misconception is that running puts tremendous wear and tear on the knees and can even bring on osteoarthritis. But a new study of almost 75,000 runners shows just the opposite: There was no association between running and osteoarthritis. In fact, runners were less likely to develop arthritis than people with lower activity levels. Running isn’t necessarily a higher-impact exercise, biomechanically speaking. While runners do apply more force with each step, that force is distributed over fewer steps (since their strides are longer). Walkers apply less force but take more strides. The bottom line: The impact of running or walking on your knees may be the same.

But keep this in mind: If you’re a woman over 55 or a man over 45, the American College of Sports Medicine recommends that you get your doctor’s okay before beginning an exercise program. While running may be easier on our joints than previously thought, it is still considered moderate to strenuous cardiovascular exercise, so it’s smart to make sure your heart and lungs are up to the challenge.

 

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Be Prepared to Fight a Winter Cold!

Be prepared to fight a winter cold. Know which two remedies can nip it in the bud.

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Though your drugstore is stocked with a multitude of cold meds, there are really just a couple of things that have actually been proven to speed up a cold. They are: vitamin C and andrographis (and your mom’s chicken soup). Take regular doses of these the moment you start feeling symptoms. That’s 500 mg of vitamin C four times a day, with plenty of water, for the next two or three days — or andrographis (as 48 mg of standardized andrographolide extract) three times daily. These remedies, alone or in combination, can reduce the average time that a cold lasts from roughly five days to three.

Excerpted from YOU: The Owners Manual, Updated and Expanded Edition by Michael F. Roizen, MD, and Mehmet C. Oz, MD.

 
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Posted by on January 2, 2014 in Clinic Reviews

 

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Physical Therapy is Conservative Care

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As an adult, you have most likely experienced back pain at some point in your life. Given its frequency, one might assume the health care system adheres to the most current guidelines that call to treat the condition conservatively, with over the counter pain medication and physical therapy. But a recent study from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests that back pain is often being over-treated with referrals to specialists, orders for expensive imaging, and prescriptions for pain medication. In our most recent episode of Move Forward Radio, we discuss the findings of this study and provide tips for avoiding back pain. http://bit.ly/1gy4V0p

 

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Tone-Up Your Triceps

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Looking for a workout move to tone up your triceps? Transform your arms with the one-arm kickback.

Biceps aren’t the only muscles we need to focus on when it comes to building strong arms. To tighten loose underarms, do the tricep-toning kickback. Here’s how: Hold a hand weight in your right hand. Lean over slightly and put your left foot forward. Place your left forearm on your left leg, or on a sturdy chair or table if you need additional support. Keeping a straight line from the top of your head to your tailbone, turn your right palm upward and push your entire arm back so that your right elbow points toward the ceiling. With your elbow in this upward position, kick the weight back and twist your palm toward the ceiling. Breathe normally. Maintain the up position and don’t drop the elbow. Try to do 50 repetitions on each side.

Excerpted from YOU: The Owner’s Manual, Updated and Expanded Edition: An Insider’s Guide to the Body That Will Make You Healthier and Younger by Michael F. Roizen and Dr. Mehmet C. Oz.

 

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Nutritional Bang for your Buck

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Get big nutritional bang for your buck with potatoes, greens and beans. They deliver the most nutrients per penny.

Trying to figure out how to squeeze more nutritious food from your budget? Add potatoes, greens and beans. A cost analysis found that these foods provide the most nutrients per penny and that tubers offer the best nutritional value in the produce aisle. Potatoes are a valuable source of potassium, vitamin C, magnesium and fiber, especially when eaten, after cooling, with the skin. They cost just 11 cents per one-cup serving and are filling to boot. Greens are simply a nutrition powerhouse. Canned or dried beans are an inexpensive and healthful alternative to meat, which is often among the priciest items at the supermarket. “Protein sources like beef, turkey, fish and chicken can be really expensive,” says Amy Jamieson-Petonic, MEd, RD, director of wellness coaching at the Cleveland Clinic, “but if you buy beans and lentils, you’re getting a lot more for your money.” One cup of beans supplies a third of a woman’s daily protein needs.

 
 

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Pink Noise & Sleep…it’s a Good Thing

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Sleep more soundly with pink noise — a low-frequency version of white noise. Playing it while you sleep improves the quality of your zzz’s.

Here’s good news for light sleepers: Adding pink noise to your bedtime routine could help you sleep better. Similar to white noise, the pink variety has a lower frequency and sounds like gentler, more muted static. Researchers found that 75 percent of sleepers reported a more restful sleep when exposed to pink noise while they slept. Brainwave activity showed that stable sleep time of people listening to pink noise increased by 23 percent.

source: The Cleveland Clinic Wellness site

 

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Frozen Produce is as Nutritious as Fresh

If you don’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables, here’s a fact you should know: Frozen produce is as nutritious as fresh.

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Do you move past the frozen vegetable section because you believe them to be nutritionally inferior to fresh produce? Believe it or not, frozen fruits and vegetables retain just as many nutrients as their fresh counterparts. While fresh produce starts out with higher vitamin content than frozen, it may lose much of its nutrition by the time you eat it, depending on the distance to its final destination. As long as frozen fruits and vegetables aren’t packed with added sugar, salt or syrups, they are a perfectly healthy way to get your daily quota.

 
 

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10 Ways to Start Exercise: Part 2 of 2

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Yesterday’s blog focused on the first five ways to get ready for exercise. Today is the second and final piece of advice on the 10 ways to start exercise.

6. Don’t Do It If You Don’t Love It
The perfect exercise is something you enjoy, according to Gordon Blackburn, MD, director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at the Cleveland Clinic. He recommends doing something you can fit in on a daily basis and something you can continue doing. Walk briskly, run, bike, use a program like Wii Fit. As the saying goes, it’s all good. Once you find what you love, aim to gradually increase the duration and intensity of your activity. As you get more fit, your functional capacity increases, so you really can do more. If you love your daily walk, add distance and build up speed. If you love bicycling, add another few miles or tackle that big hill. It all adds up, and getting going today will keep your heart going in the long run.

7. Don’t Stretch Too Soon
You probably learned to stretch before exercise in elementary school PE. But science has determined that holding stretches for 20 to 30 seconds prior to the start of a workout actually makes it more difficult for your muscles to perform. A University of Nevada study found that athletes who performed traditional hamstring stretches before working out generated less power from those muscles than athletes who did no stretching at all. For a good-for-you warm-up, do moves that raise your heart rate and promote flexibility, such as a straight-legged march: Kick your right leg straight out in front of you, keeping your toes pointed up. As you kick, reach your left fingertips to touch (or nearly touch) your right toes. Step your weight forward onto your right leg, then repeat on the left side, bringing your right hand to touch your left toes as you kick. Keep going for eight to 10 steps. As for those static stretches from your school days, there’s still a time and a place for them — after you’re done with your workout.

8. Don’t Forget Your Core
It’s no coincidence that core training and balance training are often grouped together. A strong core — which consists of your abdominal, back and pelvic muscles — can function like an insurance policy against balance-related injuries. “When your core is strong, then your protective stabilizing muscles kick in and protect you,” explains Dallas-based Pilates expert Karon Karter, author of Balance Training: Stability Workouts for Core Strength and a Sculpted Body. Studies have shown that taking a holistic view of balance training is probably the most effective route. That means changing up your exercise routine to challenge both strength and balance, and pairing it with core training. Use balance exercises to warm up for things like walking, running or biking. After establishing your balance on one foot (just holding still is a good first step), try raising and lowering your body on one leg, keeping your torso erect while bending at the knee and waist. As you get more confident, add repetitions, go lower, or move your free leg into different positions.

9. Don’t Walk With Weights
Though it may feel like you’re working harder, strapping on hand or ankle weights while you walk won’t give you the extra burn you’re looking for. And it may just increase your risk of joint problems or injuries. To burn extra calories, you would need to carry at least three- to five-pound weights — and that’s a definite no-no. When you swing the weights, it exponentially increases the force on your shoulder and elbow joints if using hand weights, or knee and hip joints if using ankle weights. For people with heart disease or high blood pressure, using weights can also cause a temporary spike in blood pressure. Leave the weights at home and boost your burn by walking up hills instead.

10. Don’t Focus on Appearance
If you can’t seem to muster the motivation to hit the gym, it may be time to rethink your reasons for going. Working out for the sake of how you look can actually discourage you from exercise. Instead of viewing physical activity as a means to a better-looking body, think of it as a way to stay healthy and feel great. Though you will burn calories, melt fat and build muscle, regular physical activity can also reduce stress, banish bad moods, ramp up energy levels and boost self-esteem. So even if a single workout doesn’t give you a Heidi Klum or Matthew McConaughey body, all that sweat and those endorphins can still make you feel like you look almost as good as they do.

source: Cleveland Clinic wellness website

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2013 in Did You Know..., What's New

 

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10 Ways to Start Exercise: Part 1 of 2

Walking, strength training, running, swimming, biking, yoga, tai chi — the possibilities for exercise are endless. The good news is that it doesn’t matter which one you choose — it just matters that you do some form of exercise.

“If you have a choice between not moving and moving — move,” says Heather Nettle, MA, coordinator of exercise physiology services for the Cleveland Clinic Sports Health and Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Center. “Ultimately it will help with overall health and well-being.” So go ahead, find an activity you love and get moving with these 10 do’s and don’ts for starting an exercise routine.

1. Do Anything — It’s Better Than Nothing
Experts are quite clear on this point: Get 30 to 60 minutes of exercise three to five days a week for improved energy, as well as to help prevent heart disease, diabetes and certain types of cancer. If you can’t dedicate that amount of time, any exercise, any movement for any amount of time is better than nothing.

2. Keep Track
Tracking your steps with a pedometer is one key to success if you like to walk, says Michael F. Roizen, MD, chief wellness officer at the Cleveland Clinic. Another is recording some basic health information before starting a new routine. “Keeping track of how your body changes inside and out over the weeks and months gives you proof of the healthy changes you’re making,” he says. A few ways to do it:
• Before your first workout, check your blood pressure at your local pharmacy. Then recheck once a month.
• Time yourself at a track or on a treadmill. See how many minutes it takes you to walk or run one mile. Retest yourself after one month of consistent exercise.
• Measure your waist circumference and your weight. Take these measurements once a week.
• Schedule a visit with your physician and request these tests: lipid panel, vitamin D and C-reactive protein. Check these levels again after six months of consistent exercise.

3. Weight-Train
There’s no question: You’ll shed pounds faster if you lift weights. That’s because strength training builds muscle, and the more muscle you have, the faster your metabolism will be. And women, hear this: You will not bulk up! What you’re doing by lifting weights is preventing muscle loss. Strength training also improves overall body composition, giving you more lean muscle tissue in relation to fat, so you look toned and trim. To experience the most benefit, lift more weight than you think you can. Dashing through your repetitions doesn’t take as much effort because it allows your muscles to rely on momentum. Instead, focus on your form by practicing slow and steady movements on both the contraction and the release. This will help you strengthen every muscle fiber.

4. Head for the Hills
Do you follow the same flat path day in and day out when you go for your walk or run? Look for hills along your route that you can slip into your routine. If it’s too much for you to tackle all at once, start by going only halfway up. Walking or running up inclines boosts the intensity of your workout: It burns more calories and helps build muscle strength and cardiovascular endurance. Switching between flat surfaces and hills is a form of interval training, a type of workout that involves short bursts of high-intensity exercise in between moderate activity. This kind of exercise, practiced by elite athletes, can supercharge your workout. It can also help keep boredom at bay. If you have joint problems, go easy on the downhill — slow your pace and shorten your stride.

5. Think Outside the Box
Even if you can’t engage in rigorous, high-intensity sweat sessions, there are plenty of other ways to improve your physical health. According to a review in the American Journal of Health Promotion, mind-body practices like tai chi and qigong may help promote bone health, cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, balance, quality of life, fall prevention and emotional well-being. Described as “meditation in motion,” tai chi and qigong involve a series of flowing, gentle movements — similar to but much slower than yoga. Interested? Get the Gaiam tai chi for beginners DVD in our clevelandclinicwellness.com wellness store.

Check back in tomorrow for the remaining 5 ways to get started on exercise!

 

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Gentlemen…

protect your prostate by eating olive oil and nuts. Choosing healthy fats over the saturated kind can help you live longer.

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Men, improve your chances of a long and healthy life by choosing olive oil and avocado over butter and mayo. Research shows that men who swapped 10 percent of their daily calories from animal fats with healthy fats like olive oil, seeds, avocados or nuts were 30 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer and 25 percent less likely to die from any other disease compared to those who did not make the switch. Even a single daily tablespoon of oil-based salad dressing, such as balsamic vinaigrette, resulted in a noticeable drop in mortality risk. To protect your health and enjoy delicious flavor, use oil and vinegar instead of cream-based dressings and cook your food with extra virgin olive oil instead of mystery “vegetable” oil.

 
 

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