RSS

Tag Archives: Adult

Physical Therapy Improves Balance & Prevents Falls

Research has shown that approximately 1/3 of all adults over the age of 65 suffer from at least one fall annually, the prevalence increases to 50 percent in adults over the age of 80. Falls are not only an inconvenience, but have also contributed in a major way to health care costs and disability in the older adults. Studies have shown that 20 percent of falls require some sort of medical attention. Furthermore, up to 10 percent of people who suffer from a fall sustain major injury such as major contusion/laceration, head trauma and disabling fractures. Fractures are a greater risk for patients with osteoporosis. You may also be surprised to find out that complications from falls are the leading cause of death from injury in adults over the age of 65.

There are multiple reasons why people fall and they include prior history of falls, visual deficits, gait abnormality, lower extremity weakness, arthritis, balance deficits and environmental hazards. As we age balance regresses, joints become more arthritic, flexibility decreases and reaction time slows down. However, balance impairments can be improved and the risk for falls can be reduced, with practice.

Medical studies show effectiveness of physical therapy interventions in treatment of balance dysfunction and therefore decreasing the risk for falls. Exercise programs may target strength, balance, flexibility or endurance. Programs that contain two or more of these components reduce rate of falls and number of people falling.

A skilled physical therapist is capable of accurately diagnosing balance dysfunction and risk for falls by a comprehensive evaluation including history taking, physical examination, as well as functional/balance tests. Physical therapy treatment should be patient specific and based on needs established during initial evaluation. Most often it will consist of a combination of balance activities, functional training, strengthening and stabilization exercises, as well as environmental awareness/modification training with the patient.

untitled (3)

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Physical Therapy is Conservative Care

1234191_10151878168594841_41728483_n

As an adult, you have most likely experienced back pain at some point in your life. Given its frequency, one might assume the health care system adheres to the most current guidelines that call to treat the condition conservatively, with over the counter pain medication and physical therapy. But a recent study from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) suggests that back pain is often being over-treated with referrals to specialists, orders for expensive imaging, and prescriptions for pain medication. In our most recent episode of Move Forward Radio, we discuss the findings of this study and provide tips for avoiding back pain. http://bit.ly/1gy4V0p

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pink Noise & Sleep…it’s a Good Thing

cleveland clinic

images

Sleep more soundly with pink noise — a low-frequency version of white noise. Playing it while you sleep improves the quality of your zzz’s.

Here’s good news for light sleepers: Adding pink noise to your bedtime routine could help you sleep better. Similar to white noise, the pink variety has a lower frequency and sounds like gentler, more muted static. Researchers found that 75 percent of sleepers reported a more restful sleep when exposed to pink noise while they slept. Brainwave activity showed that stable sleep time of people listening to pink noise increased by 23 percent.

source: The Cleveland Clinic Wellness site

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Frozen Produce is as Nutritious as Fresh

If you don’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables, here’s a fact you should know: Frozen produce is as nutritious as fresh.

CC_Wellness Tip

Do you move past the frozen vegetable section because you believe them to be nutritionally inferior to fresh produce? Believe it or not, frozen fruits and vegetables retain just as many nutrients as their fresh counterparts. While fresh produce starts out with higher vitamin content than frozen, it may lose much of its nutrition by the time you eat it, depending on the distance to its final destination. As long as frozen fruits and vegetables aren’t packed with added sugar, salt or syrups, they are a perfectly healthy way to get your daily quota.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

10 Ways to Start Exercise: Part 2 of 2

images

Yesterday’s blog focused on the first five ways to get ready for exercise. Today is the second and final piece of advice on the 10 ways to start exercise.

6. Don’t Do It If You Don’t Love It
The perfect exercise is something you enjoy, according to Gordon Blackburn, MD, director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program at the Cleveland Clinic. He recommends doing something you can fit in on a daily basis and something you can continue doing. Walk briskly, run, bike, use a program like Wii Fit. As the saying goes, it’s all good. Once you find what you love, aim to gradually increase the duration and intensity of your activity. As you get more fit, your functional capacity increases, so you really can do more. If you love your daily walk, add distance and build up speed. If you love bicycling, add another few miles or tackle that big hill. It all adds up, and getting going today will keep your heart going in the long run.

7. Don’t Stretch Too Soon
You probably learned to stretch before exercise in elementary school PE. But science has determined that holding stretches for 20 to 30 seconds prior to the start of a workout actually makes it more difficult for your muscles to perform. A University of Nevada study found that athletes who performed traditional hamstring stretches before working out generated less power from those muscles than athletes who did no stretching at all. For a good-for-you warm-up, do moves that raise your heart rate and promote flexibility, such as a straight-legged march: Kick your right leg straight out in front of you, keeping your toes pointed up. As you kick, reach your left fingertips to touch (or nearly touch) your right toes. Step your weight forward onto your right leg, then repeat on the left side, bringing your right hand to touch your left toes as you kick. Keep going for eight to 10 steps. As for those static stretches from your school days, there’s still a time and a place for them — after you’re done with your workout.

8. Don’t Forget Your Core
It’s no coincidence that core training and balance training are often grouped together. A strong core — which consists of your abdominal, back and pelvic muscles — can function like an insurance policy against balance-related injuries. “When your core is strong, then your protective stabilizing muscles kick in and protect you,” explains Dallas-based Pilates expert Karon Karter, author of Balance Training: Stability Workouts for Core Strength and a Sculpted Body. Studies have shown that taking a holistic view of balance training is probably the most effective route. That means changing up your exercise routine to challenge both strength and balance, and pairing it with core training. Use balance exercises to warm up for things like walking, running or biking. After establishing your balance on one foot (just holding still is a good first step), try raising and lowering your body on one leg, keeping your torso erect while bending at the knee and waist. As you get more confident, add repetitions, go lower, or move your free leg into different positions.

9. Don’t Walk With Weights
Though it may feel like you’re working harder, strapping on hand or ankle weights while you walk won’t give you the extra burn you’re looking for. And it may just increase your risk of joint problems or injuries. To burn extra calories, you would need to carry at least three- to five-pound weights — and that’s a definite no-no. When you swing the weights, it exponentially increases the force on your shoulder and elbow joints if using hand weights, or knee and hip joints if using ankle weights. For people with heart disease or high blood pressure, using weights can also cause a temporary spike in blood pressure. Leave the weights at home and boost your burn by walking up hills instead.

10. Don’t Focus on Appearance
If you can’t seem to muster the motivation to hit the gym, it may be time to rethink your reasons for going. Working out for the sake of how you look can actually discourage you from exercise. Instead of viewing physical activity as a means to a better-looking body, think of it as a way to stay healthy and feel great. Though you will burn calories, melt fat and build muscle, regular physical activity can also reduce stress, banish bad moods, ramp up energy levels and boost self-esteem. So even if a single workout doesn’t give you a Heidi Klum or Matthew McConaughey body, all that sweat and those endorphins can still make you feel like you look almost as good as they do.

source: Cleveland Clinic wellness website

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 16, 2013 in Did You Know..., What's New

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gentlemen…

protect your prostate by eating olive oil and nuts. Choosing healthy fats over the saturated kind can help you live longer.

CC_Wellness Tip

Men, improve your chances of a long and healthy life by choosing olive oil and avocado over butter and mayo. Research shows that men who swapped 10 percent of their daily calories from animal fats with healthy fats like olive oil, seeds, avocados or nuts were 30 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer and 25 percent less likely to die from any other disease compared to those who did not make the switch. Even a single daily tablespoon of oil-based salad dressing, such as balsamic vinaigrette, resulted in a noticeable drop in mortality risk. To protect your health and enjoy delicious flavor, use oil and vinegar instead of cream-based dressings and cook your food with extra virgin olive oil instead of mystery “vegetable” oil.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Be Prepped for your Primary Care Doctor

cleveland clinic

The average visit with a doctor lasts mere minutes. Bring a list of your top three concerns and questions to make sure they get covered.

On average, visits to a family doctor generally last about 15 minutes. That’s not a lot of time to cover every facet of your health. Going to your appointment as prepared as possible can help both you and your doctor make the most of every minute. Before your visit, make a list of your top concerns. Why are you there? What’s been bothering you? Be prepared to describe your symptoms as accurately as possible: Where does it hurt, when did it start, does it get better or worse with movement, and how bad is the pain? Jotting everything down ahead of time will help you communicate your questions and concerns more accurately. Be prepared with a list of all the medications you’re taking, including supplements. If you see multiple doctors, make sure they all have an updated list. Lastly, write down your top three questions for your doctor, in order of importance. That way you’ll be sure to cover your most pressing concerns.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mean People….Just Stay Positive

CC_Wellness TipTo deal with mean people, “Stay positive and courteous,” says mind-body coach Jane Ehrman. “Fighting back only fuels the problem.”

From rude coworkers to short-tempered bosses to impatient drivers, mean people do make an appearance now and then. As we all know from experience, being the recipient of someone else’s antagonistic behavior can really bring us down, even on an otherwise great day. Research shows that a negative interaction has a five times greater impact on us than a positive one. In other words, it takes five good things to offset just one bad thing. So how do you keep a mean person from ruining your day? Instead of attacking back, kill that meanie with kindness. And treat yourself with kindness too. Sometimes we don’t want to admit that someone has gotten under our skin. Instead of denying your hurt feelings, acknowledge them.

As for the other person, try to see past their actions. “Mean-spirited people are unhappy, to say the least. Inside they are hurting, living out of fear, insecurity and anger. They don’t feel good about themselves or their lives, so they lash out at others,” says Jane Pernotto Ehrman, MEd, mind-body coach and behavioral health specialist at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine. “Mostly, it isn’t about you, it’s about them. Recognizing that there are underlying issues can make it easier for you to respond with compassion and understanding. Take the high road and respond with kindness.” After all, while you can’t change another person’s behavior, you can change your reaction to him or her. Being kind to someone who has hurt you may inspire that person to see the good in themselves as well.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Deep Tissue Massage too Expensive? Try a foam roller instead…

untitled (6)cleveland clinic

Can’t afford a deep-tissue massage? Use a foam roller after your workouts to increase circulation and ease knots in all your muscles.

Ever wondered about those foam logs you see people rolling around on at the gym? They’re called foam rollers, and they’re an effective — and inexpensive — addition to your workout. Used as part of a warm-up, rolling improves circulation and gets the body ready for movement. It also helps with recovery after your workout. Like a deep-tissue massage, foam rollers help break up knots that tighten your muscles, helping you stay injury-free. Use them to loosen up tight areas in your quads, calves or outer thighs.

“The basic technique for using a foam roller is to slowly roll the targeted area over the foam roller. Once you hit a trigger spot, hold at that spot for a few seconds, slowly working yourself away from the spot,” says Melissa Hendricks, MEd, manager of the Cleveland Clinic Fitness Centers. “Use a foam roller with caution,” advises Hendricks. “When you hit the trigger spots, they can be very painful, and sometimes the foam rollers can cause mild bruising. Have a physical therapist show you how to properly use the roller when you’re trying it for the first time.”

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

What is Knee Replacement?
knrr

Knee replacement, also known as a Total Knee Replacement or Knee Arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure that is performed to remove worn, diseased or damaged bone and cartilage and replace it with an artificial joint, or prosthesis, that is made of metal and plastic. Undergoing knee replacement surgery can help relieve pain and allows patients to return to normal everyday activities. For those who have become bow-legged or knock-kneed over the years, it can also straighten the legs into a more natural position.

Why a Knee Replacement?
The most common reason for knee replacement surgery is to repair joint damage caused by osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. People who need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. They may also experience moderate or severe knee pain at rest. There are many types of arthritis but most knee pain is caused by just three types: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

• Osteoarthritis. This is an age-related “wear and tear” type of arthritis. It usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older, but may occur in younger people, too. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the knee softens and wears away. The bones then rub against one another, causing knee pain and stiffness.
• Rheumatoid arthritis. This is a disease in which the synovial membrane that surrounds the joint becomes inflamed and thickened. This chronic inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of a group of disorders termed “inflammatory arthritis.”
• Post-traumatic arthritis. This can follow a serious knee injury. Fractures of the bones surrounding the knee or tears of the knee ligaments may damage the articular cartilage over time, causing knee pain and limiting knee function.

Matt Smith Physical Therapy can help with your pre and post-operative care for knee replacement.

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,